8 Destinations For Solo Travel Around the World

Some of the best adventures are had while we’re pushed outside of our comfort zones. Traveling alone is one of the most rewarding and enriching experiences anyone can have, especially a woman. I cannot say this enough. If you feel nervous, start slow. Plan a long weekend away in the US or your home country. Once you’ve built up the confidence many people feel they need to travel alone, take a longer trip abroad. Regardless of where your first trip may take you, these 8 non-European and US cities are musts for your solo travel bucket list. I call this…8 Destinations For Solo Travel Around the World. It should be a longer list, just like the US and European lists should have been longer, but we’d be getting into novel length territory. As much as I’d love to write the next great American novel, none of us here currently have time for that. So from the temples of Cambodia to the festivals of Quebec, here are 8 destinations for solo travelers around the world.

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Bangkok, Thailand
Now is the ideal time to plan a trip to Bangkok. I’ll be honest, Thailand wasn’t the first place that came to mind when I thought about solo travel. A friend of mine traveled to Bangkok with family and had an exceptional experience. While I was polling friends and family to find out what countries and cities they felt would be great for women looking to travel alone for the first time, she insisted I consider Bangkok. After a little research, I couldn’t agree more. November to February will see the coolest temperatures in Thailand. December and January see the highest number of tourists so if you prefer a less crowded experience, November and February will offer less crowds without the sweltering temperatures or downpouring rain.

Bangkok is known for their street food which is almost everywhere. It might not be the traditional Thai food you’re familiar with from the local takeout place but it will no doubt blow your mind. Communication might not be smooth sailing as the people largely use their own native language (rightfully so), but you will find plenty of kindness. Thailand thrives from tourism and the people know this so they’ve become incredibly welcoming to visitors. With that said, don’t let vendors take advantage of you! Haggling is a common practice in Thailand and while it might seem intimidating, have a little fun with it. It’s more of a game than an anxious confrontation.

Photo c/o @ yesrenteria

Photo c/o @yesrenteria

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Budapest, Hungary
Hungary is a country that should be on any travel bucket list for the history alone. Many different groups of people left a mark on Hungary but you’ll see the strongest influence from the Romans and the Turkish empire. You can still enjoy thermal baths which are as popular with the locals as they are with tourists. Something I did not know about Budapest, it is literally split into Buda and Pest! The two parts of the city are separated by the Danube River and have very different vibes. Buda is home to more of the historical monuments and architecture of the city. Here you will find lots of old cobblestone roads, the Castle District and quiet nights. Adversely, Pest is where you go for a fun nightlife scene. Pest is the home of the Jewish Quarter where there are an endless amount of unique cafes and ruin bars to visit. Even though Buda is where most of the historic buildings are, you can still find things like the House of Terror and St. Stephen’s Basilica in Pest. If you’re worried about traveling solo in Budapest, don’t. It’s very friendly towards travelers, even women who are on their own.

Hanoi, Vietnam
The capital city of Vietnam, Hanoi is a busy, bustling experience surrounded by beaches, mountains, ruins, and more. Whatever you can think of to want in a travel experience, Hanoi has to offer. While it might be overwhelming at first, Hanoi deserves a chance if you’re willing to be a little adventurous in your solo travels. A great place to stay in Hanoi is the Old Quarter. For starters, many of the popular hotels are located here which is convenient in itself. Second, many of the sights that will be on your list are also located here such as Hoan Kiem Lake. It’s also a hub for shopping, dining, and more. A few things that you’ll want to make sure are on your list: Vietnamese coffee (trust me), street food (one of the things Hanoi is known for), and the Hanoi Night Market. The Night Market is a reprieve from the general rule of staying in at night as a solo traveler. If you feel comfortable, venture out. The market will still be crowded enough to feel safe but not as congested as the daytime markets feel. There’s less haggling as well since the vendors and shopkeepers are much more casual and relaxed.

Sites to consider visiting include Van Mieu, Hao Lo Prison, and the Vietnam Army Museum. Van Mieu, otherwise known as the Temple of Literature, is supposedly the most beautiful to visit. Hao Lo Prison, also known as Hanoi Hilton, can be a little controversial. The information the museum shares isn’t exactly historically accurate according to accounts from those who experienced the prison during the Vietnam War. If you keep an open mind, it’s an interesting exhibit sharing insight into what the Vietnamese went through while trying to gain independence from France. The WanderBlogger has a great guide to Hanoi featuring 8 things you should do.

Mexico City, Mexico
When you think of Mexican travel spots, Cancun and Playa del Carmen might be the first cities that come to mind. Mexico City, although not a beachside city, should be at the top of your Central American bucket list. Bursting with cultural experiences, Mexico City is filled with Mexican history and culture from the food to the art scene. This destination is ideal for the foodie, the history buff, the art lover, the frugal traveler, and most definitely...the solo traveler. The bustling city has the second largest collection of museums (who knew?!), thousands of restaurants including high-end dining experiences, and an unlimited amount of things to do.

Let’s start with history. Mexico City is surrounded by some of the more notable Mayan, Aztec, and Mesoamerican ruins. For art lovers, on top of the many art museums and ancient sculptures littered throughout the city, you’ll also find many to Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera. There’s a museum solely dedicated to Kahlo located in her old family home as well as to both Kahlo and Rivera in their old studio. While Asian countries are said to have the best street food in the world, natives of Mexico City might disagree. From tacos to tamales, the capital city has a lively food scene that rivals those of Thailand and Vietnam (also mentioned in this post). That doesn’t mean you can’t find a gourmet meal though! Oh no, Mexico City has many restaurants that provide unique, high-end dining experiences including tasting menus. The difference between Mexico City and say...Chicago? It’ll cost you a lot less. Ultimately, Mexico City should be a bucket list item for the solo traveler or at the very least, the frugal traveler.

Photo c/o @ yesrenteria

Photo c/o @yesrenteria

Quebec, Canada
Hopefully my next solo excursion this fall, Quebec is the closest US natives can get to Europe without flying across the Atlantic. Similar to France, Quebec has a strong, proud culture and history. There’s an episode of No Reservations with Anthony Bourdain in the first season that really dives into the culture of the region. It’s actually one of the reasons I was inspired to include Quebec rather than any other Canadian city or province in this post. Expect to speak the Quebecois dialect of French with signs throughout the cities only in French. It doesn’t take a linguist to translate the meaning of said signs but it’s something to prepare for. When traveling to the Quebec province in Canada, there are two big city options: Quebec City and Montreal. Both are worth adding to your itinerary but they each have their own individual experiences.

Montreal is the more cosmopolitan of the two cities and Quebec City is much more historical. Not to say that Montreal doesn’t have its fair share of history and Old World feel. Quebec City just has more doors to the past. For example, Quebec City is home to Old Quebec where you can find the original walled fortifications of the city now designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Quebec City is also where you’ll find the Citadelle of Quebec which is Canada’s oldest military building and the Notre-Dame de Quebec Basilica that dates back to the 17th century. Let’s not knock Montreal though. This city has plenty to offer all it’s own. While Quebec City might have a more Old World feel to it, Montreal has embraced the 21st century while still remembering where it came from. Montreal has a vibrant food scene with classic patisseries, English pubs, food markets, delis and more. It’s a city that loves festivals with more than 90 in a calendar year especially their famous Jazz Festival. The art scene is established and always growing. Regardless of which city you choose, there are plenty of things to occupy your time, more than enough restaurants to keep your belly full, and enough culture to make you leave feeling enriched and ready to return at a moment’s notice.

Queenstown, New Zealand
There are a lot of reasons why New Zealand deserves to be on this list. The people are incredibly friendly, it’s one of the safest countries in the world, and there’s a range of adventures from city exploration to remote hiking trails. One day you can be exploring a Hobbit Town, the next you can be on a vineyard tour sipping delightful wines, and the next you can be staring up at a crystal clear sky in the mountains. The versatility of the country is unique. Queenstown in particular is more of the adventurous region of New Zealand. Home to a vast number of nature activities from hiking to skiing, there is plenty of land to explore and things to do. A visit to Queenstown is great for the scenery alone. The landscape and backdrops that surround you all over are breathtaking.

Santiago, Chile
It may be surprising (it was to me) but Santiago Chile is one of the safest cities to visit in South America. With low crime rates and trustworthy police, Santiago has become one of the more popular Latin American travel destinations and rightfully so. Santiago has everything going for it from a rich urban culture to gorgeous mountains and vibrant vineyards and wineries. Let’s talk about those for a minute. The best travel times for Santiago are from March to May and August to November. However my vote is March to May because that’s fall in Santiago which means harvest season. Wineries in Chile, just like any other place in the world celebrate the harvest with festivals and it’s a wonderful time to enjoy the world-class wine from the region. The weather is also mild making it a comfortable time to travel without the crowds that summer brings. Santiago is a great city for frugal travelers as the conversion rate is in the American’s favor plus everything is less expensive. There are also a large number of things to see and do for free. For foodie travelers, dive into classic sopaipillas, explore Peruvian cuisine, and enjoy fresh fish caught that morning. If you ask me, I’m in for the sopaipillas alone!

Siem Reap, Cambodia
Known as the home of Angkor Wat, Siem Reap is a city rich in history, culture, and welcoming locals making it a great destination for traveling alone. Depending on where you’re traveling from, Siem Reap might not be particular cheap to get to but it’s rather inexpensive to visit. Walk ancient ruins in Angkor Wat (translated to “City of Temples”), the largest religious monument in the world. This is a high traffic area for tourists so if you’re one who tends to avoid crowds, do a little research to see which of the temples are not as popular or head over early. The early bird always misses the crowd. Because Siem Reap is a smaller town there isn’t much nightlife which works in the favor of solo travel. However, if you’d like to grab a post-Indiana Jones adventure cocktail, Pub Street is the place to be! Cambodia as a whole is known for their cuisine and lifestyle rooted in strong wellness practices. From yoga retreats to spa days, there is no shortage of opportunities to rejuvenate before the long flight home.

5 Places To Travel & Escape The Heat

Normally when people think about taking a vacation, there’s a beach involved, a few margaritas and plenty of sunshine. Me? I hibernate until fall comes around and then get my jetsetter on. Walking around and exploring all day long isn’t the same when you’re sweating through your clothes and unbearably warm. Beach destinations are fantastic if your main plans include laying in the sand all day but when you have an itinerary, it’s much more enjoyable if you can walk around for more than ten minutes without wanting to strip down on the sidewalk. I seem to be of the rare breed that prefers cooler temperatures for comfort. If you want to do some traveling over these next few warmer months but prefer not to be sweltering (like me), these destinations are just the ticket.

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Alaska
When in doubt, go north. Summer in Alaska is much more tolerable than summer in any part of the continental states. Alaska offers a lot of different options too. From big city experiences to getting in touch with nature, Alaska has it all and with great weather too. Get an urban experience with plenty of culture and activities in Anchorage, Alaska’s largest city, or Juneau, the capital. Venture to Glacier Bay National Park for a rare glimpse at nature in all its wonder with humpback whales, sea lions, bald eagles and more. Get a taste of the Gold Rush with small historic towns like Sitka, also known for its moment of fame in The Proposal. Experience early settlements left behind from Native American and Russian cultures or venture to parts of Alaska that are still home to natives. Bethel in Southwest Alaska, is home to dozens of Native Alaskan villages making it an incredible experience for those who appreciate a cultural immersion.

Photo by   Steve Halama   on   Unsplash

Argentina
On the opposite end of the planet for us living in the northern hemisphere, Argentina is experiencing winter during our summertime but don’t let that stop you from visiting! Winter in Argentina, unless you head up into the Andes, tends to average from the mid-50s to mid-60s. It’s beautiful weather for exploring and drinking in as much of the country as you can. An obvious destination to visit is Buenos Aires, also known as the “Paris of South America.” This city has everything you can think of from sidewalk cafes to historical and architectural sites. All you wine lovers, add Mendoza to your summer travel list. Boasting temperatures in the 60s, this city is known for its vineyards and wineries but more specifically, its Malbec. Think of it as the Sonoma of Argentina. Enough to keep busy but casual beyond belief.

New Zealand
Oh, New Zealand. The country I almost fled to after the last election with real life hobbit holes and gorgeous panoramas. While many of us are experiencing scorching summer heat, New Zealand is in the thick of their winter which has temperature highs ranging from the 50s to 60s. And if you haven’t caught on yet, this is perfect travel weather in my opinion. For all you nature lovers, New Zealand is a prime location to travel to being one of the best hiking destinations in the world. Wander along one of their beaches or tackle one of the many “Great Walks.” They have an option for every skill level, even the amateurs like me! Foodies can rejoice in the burgeoning culinary boom in Auckland, Wellington and Napier plus, the coffee scene is darn good as well. And let’s not forget the #1 reason to travel to New Zealand...the hobbit holes. For any of you Lord of the Rings and Hobbit trilogy nerds (fellow fans of mine), you may be familiar with New Zealand as the filming location for these epic films. Visit The Shire, take a tour, or even stay in a Hobbit Hole! It’s the most amazing thing ever and 100% on my bucket list.

Photo by   Lucas Gruwez   on   Unsplash

San Francisco
Known for having the best weather year-round, San Francisco is one of those places that’s good to visit any time of year. While it’s not particularly cool, average temperatures throughout the summertime range from the mid 60s to low 70s and you know it’s always breezy! San Francisco is actually the warmest in the late summer/early fall, perfect if you want to enter the warmth of sunny Napa Valley or Sonoma for a weekend wine tasting during harvest season. Don’t miss these favorite sights to see, grab a little soul food or great cappuccino, and prepare yourself for the insane hills. Not quite sure where to start? Check out our Quick Guide to San Francisco.

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Scotland
You don't have to worry about sweltering during the summertime in Scotland! With temperatures averaging in the 60s, Scotland has beautiful summer days with elongated sunsets. Scotland may be of the smaller countries in the United Kingdom but it is jam packed with natural habitats, historical sites, castles that are hundreds of years old, and tons of culture. It’s a place that will adopt you as a local rather fast because you’re immersed from the second you arrive to the second you leave. Visit a distillery for some of the best whiskey you’ll ever sip and don’t miss the chance for a real pub meal. Not only will it save you money, but you’ll get a feel for what the locals prefer to chow down on. Finally, if you’re not planning on staying in one place, consider taking a train ride as they’re known for exceptional rail routes and scenery. The West Highland Railway Line might be the most popular but there are others as well.

Photo by   Adam Wilson   on   Unsplash

Photo by Adam Wilson on Unsplash

There are quite a few fantastic places to visit in the summer if you’re looking to avoid the heat. Heading to the southern hemisphere is a great option as long as you’re not close to the equator and heading north is also a pretty good bet. Scandinavian and Nordic countries are a pretty good option with average high temperatures for Finland, Greenland and Iceland ranging from the 50s to 70s.

So tell me in the comments below, do you prefer to cool off in the summer or embrace the heat?